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When a design comes along that is so remarkably different as in the case of the Desert House also called the Ribcage Skeleton House, you definitely take notice! The only option is to analyze it in the hope of understanding such a design. One thing that can be certainly said is, it is undoubtedly a courageous design; that pushes the boundaries making it experimental and wonderfully innovative.

“Others have seen what is and asked why. I have seen what could be and asked why not. ”
― Pablo Picasso, Pablo Picasso: Metamorphoses of the Human Form : Graphic Works, 1895-1972

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Image Source: Home Adore
Desert House by Kendrick Bangs Kellogg

 

An artist delivers a message but what is the message here in this instance ?

When shown to a random group to comment, these were the three prominent answers:

1. It can be inferred that the house is a message about beauty at the core, or in this case the bone

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Image Source: Home Adore
Desert House by Kendrick Bangs Kellogg

 

2. Is it about internal turmoil.

Image Source: edvardmunch.org The Scream, 1893 by Edvard Munch

Image Source: edvardmunch.org
The Scream, 1893 by Edvard Munch

Image Source: Home Adore Desert House by Kendrick Bangs Kellogg

Image Source: Home Adore
Desert House by Kendrick Bangs Kellogg

 

 

3. The main theory is about connecting with nature.

Image Source: Home Adore Desert House by Kendrick Bangs Kellogg

Image Source: Home Adore
Desert House by Kendrick Bangs Kellogg

 

So let us look at the facts:

Insight into Kendrick Bangs Kellogg.

Kendrick Bangs Kellogg (born 1934) is an Amer­i­can architect known for being an in­no­va­tor of organic architecture. His work has been described as the Sydney Opera House meets Stonehenge.

Kellogg’s architecture does not fit neatly into the same category as Frank Lloyd Wright, Bruce Goff, Bart Prince, or other organic architects. 

Like Goff, Wright, and many other architects, Kellogg’s build­ings are stud­ies of lay­ered, seg­mented, and un­fold­ing space. A big dif­fer­ence be­tween Goff and Kel­logg in­volves the feel­ing of per­ma­nence and impermanence in their ar­chi­tec­ture.

With Goff, part of the ex­cite­ment is that one feels that the wind could shake the house down, so lightly is the struc­ture teth­ered to the earth. Kel­logg houses feel heavy, firmly con­nected to their foun­da­tions. The beams and ra­di­at­ing mem­bers re­mind peo­ple of the stout keels and ribs in ships de­signed to weather storms. Kellogg’s vis­i­ble in­te­rior struc­ture re­minds ob­servers of spinal columns that sup­ported the weight of whales or dinosaurs

Kellogg said, »To re­al­ize truly cre­ative ar­chi­tec­ture you need clients with the vi­sion and imag­i­na­tion to make the most of any site. Great clients are those who allow and ar­chi­tect the lat­i­tude to give them what they didn’t know they wanted until they have it! They are will­ing to risk being unique.

 

 

Desert House by Kendrick Bangs Kellogg- the project.

The Desert House located inJoshua Tree National Park, California, United States was actually conceived in 1988 and completed in 1993. The home is made of steel, copper, concrete and glass.

Description by Kendrick Bangs Kellogg

The most important architectural house you may have never seen. It is physically of the desert, a part of its surroundings. The strength of the hard and rugged protective shell exterior is drawn from the desert. The interior is a warm intimate space of flowing organic shapes. The property highlights the masculine and feminine forms that are the hallmark of organic architecture.

Visit Kendrick Bangs Kellogg

 

References

archINFORM – International Architecture Database. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://eng.archinform.net/arch/70227.htm#cite_note-pearson-3

Desert House by Kendrick Bangs Kellogg | Home Adore. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.homeadore.com/2014/05/27/desert-house-kendrick-bangs-kellogg/

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