Tags

, , , , , ,

Last time we posted we gave you a few exterior features of a building that will assist you in bringing the outdoors indoors. Today we will discuss a few interior examples to embrace the outdoors. To continue our list

6. Adding trees and smaller plants Indoors in the right location really brings the greenery alive.

B House by I.House Architecture and Construction

Explanation as to why it works so well.

“With this design task, we proposed the “double-skin house” approach. The outer skin (or layer) is the “wall” built up by hollow concrete bricks of 30x30cm to let the wind, sunlight and rain in the house, while ensuring security. Behind the first “clothing” are spaces interspersed with green trees, to filter dust and reduce heat, noise in the house and bring a close, natural setting for the home. Next is the inner skin with large glass panels open in full range, the owner can enjoy intimate touch to all natural scenery outside.

B House by I.House Architecture and Construction

B House by I.House Architecture and Construction

However, the most special matter in design is not in the “double-skin house” plan but a small garden in the middle of the house, where all spatial separation is abolished that let all members of family gather and dispel tiredness every day after work.

B House by I.House Architecture and Construction

B House by I.House Architecture and Construction

A small space with playground, garden, minimalist wooden stairs and iron, all soaked under the natural light could really create the heart of the home. Here, the architect team created a space for all generations can communicate with each other, from the swing for small children, the garden for grandparents to relax and take care of trees, to where parents can display their cooking skills. The puzzle of “open but introverted space” was excellently solved.

The solution to take light and wind from the functional spaces such as buffer garden, mobile glass roof, ventilating concrete walls enabled the house to be imbued with sunlight, natural cool air and above all, all the rooms have two sides exposed to natural light. The design team’s delicate calculations is shown in each period: during noon, the sunlight directly shine to the garden, the remaining spaces take light reflected through the concrete wall; in the afternoon, light filters through ventilating brick walls and create depth through shadow by materials on the floor and wall. The principle of convection and direct ventilation was also strictly applied, helping the indoor space get natural wind. Thus, the light – ventilation issue was resolved to give the owner a home that is close and friendly with the environment and nature.” [Source: archdaily]

B House by I.House Architecture and Construction

B House by I.House Architecture and Construction






7. Additional greenery may be created by purchasing Green Artificial Grass Turf Area Rugs or carpets for that lovely lawn feel.

Image via Houzz

Margie Grace – Grace Design Associates [Image via Houzz ]

Explanation as to why it works so well.

Fake grass,you say? Don’t scoff. Synthetic turf is moving beyond football fields and golf courses to become more common in home landscapes. I’ll show you how this material can make sense in many home applications and even solve some landscaping problems that vex so many of us. Is it right for you? Find out here. [Source: houzz]

1

Harold Leidner Landscape Architects [Image via Houzz ]

Faux-Grass-3

Foundation Landscape Design [Image via Houzz ]






8. Adding Real lawn indoors, a building that features lawn inside.

Photograph by PA (via designboom )

Photograph by PA (via designboom )

Explanation as to why it works so well.

UK turf company lindum has covered the entirety of the nave belonging to york minster with a layer of real grass. Rather than growing turf from a soil base, the company instead starts their roll-able plant sheets from a felt structure formed from recycled british textiles, developed by lindum. a team of ten workers extended a layer of plastic upon the ground of the church, then putting in place the soil-less plant artwork, transforming the gothic structure’s nave into a green expanse of interior space. [Source: designboom]

York Minster Cathedral

York Minster Cathedral

Now I’m sure you’re wondering, is it really grass? How does it work?

– It is real grass that is grown completely free of soil
– The grass is grown in felt, made from 100% recycled textiles
– Still requires water, light and nutrients and can be mowed
– Can go on variety of surface (walls, ceilings, stairs, etc.)
– After event is complete, can be rolled up and transported away [Source: twistedsifter]

Photograph via Sky News (via designboom)

Photograph via Sky News (via designboom)

 






 9. Living walls to make the indoors feel more lively.

Drexel University Biowall

Drexel University Biowall

Explanation as to why it works so well.

Parker Urban Greenscapes installed this huge biowall in the atrium of Drexel University’s new Papadakis Integrated Sciences Building in the fall of 2011. The 80-foot tall BioWall which boasts over 1,500 plants and is actually an integrated part of the building’s air handling system to help clean the indoor air. [Source: inhabitat]

Vertical Garden at the Yoyogi Village in Tokyo

Vertical Garden at the Yoyogi Village in Tokyo

Vertical Garden at the Yoyogi Village in Tokyo

Explanation as to why it works so well.

This awe-inspiring urban retreat in the middle of Tokyo not only boasts shipping container architecture but a beautiful living wall inside. Designed by Wonderwall and landscape designer Seijun Nishinata, the verdant vertical garden makes this spot a hot attraction.






 10. Purchase furniture that continues the overall ‘nature theme’. 

PANATLANTIC'S NATURE THEMED OFFICE

PANATLANTIC’S NATURE THEMED OFFICE [Photography by Eric Laignel]

At the PanAtlantic Exploration Company, high up in a Houston tower, Mayfield and Ragni Studio, aka MaRS, proves that subtlety is best. The public face of the two-level, 50,000-square-foot space is the double-height reception area, where maps and nature inspired the furnishings, finishes, and artwork.

panel paintings by Blakely Bering. Photography by Eric Laignel

panel paintings by Blakely Bering. Photography by Eric Laignel

Take a wall installation by a young Texan sculptor—its hundreds of dots, starting down by the banquette and ascending 17 feet, mimic a geological map provided by PanAtlantic. Meanwhile, the reception desk’s facets re­semble a geode, and the rug’s cut-pile pattern was based on a topographical map.

1

a custom wool-silk rug meets an installation of plaster-wrapped resin dots by Paul Fleming. [Photography by Eric Laignel.]

“Because the building has oddly shaped floor plates, we made the space experiential,” Kelie Mayfield adds. Floating above the reception area, white powder-coated fins undulate in the blinking light of LEDs installed in a ceiling cove. The idea was for visitors to feel as if they’re underwater, walking on the ocean floor. [Source: interiordesign]

Photography by Eric Laignel

Photography by Eric Laignel

For more examples visit our article ‘Nature inspired furniture

 






TO BE CONTINUED…

Advertisements